Course Descriptions
2011-2012 Student Handbook


(Course descriptions are not intended as an assurance or warranty of achievement of specific skills or knowledge.)

HI 5000 Fundamentals of Technical Writing (web-based instruction)

3 semesters hours of credit/meets part of the core competencies

This course is required if the GRE submitted for admission verbal score is below 640 or if the MAT score is below 432. If your test scores are above these two thresholds, this course can be waived with approval. This course will not be used as credit for your degree plan.

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

This course assists the student in the area of professional writing, the development of scholarly and academic writing abilities. Each student will complete the process of generating a written document from topic selection through outlining and drafting. Writing in the field of Health Informatics will be addressed and the student will explore the genre of written discourse in informatics.

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HI 5001 Special Topics: Health Informatics (Variable hours/week) 1-10 Semester Credits

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

This course provides a timely way to examine cutting edge topics of interest to students and Faculty. The varying content may include topics such as: technical writing in Health Informatics comparing knowledge use across disciplines, computational knowledge methods in Health Informatics for example. This course may be repeated as topics vary.

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HI 5002 Directed Study: Health Informatics (Variable hours/week) 1-10 Semester Credits

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor This course provides a mechanism for students to explore issues of personal interest in the field of Health Informatics. The varying content may include topics such as: display of large scale nursing data, mapping issues for dentistry, linking public health knowledge to clinical medicine. This course may be graded on a letter grade or pass/fail basis and may be repeated as topics vary.

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HI 5003 Molecules to Man for Health Informatics (3 hours lecture/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/ meets part of the Health Informatics Core Competencies
Prerequisites: consent of the instructor

This course provides an overview of human biology required to understand health informatics. It is designed for anyone without a modern biology background. The first part of the course introduces biological molecules and molecular interactions. The majority of the course surveys the anatomy and physiology of major body systems, in both health and disease.

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HI 5004 Introduction to Clinical Healthcare (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets of the Health Informatics Core Competencies
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

The course starts at the individual practitioner level with attention to physician, nurse and allied health. Since administration is a critical component of modern health care. At this level, the skills, duties and training requirements for various occupations are covered. (formerly HI 5309)

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HI 5005 Essential Mathematics for Biomedicine (3 hours lecture/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/ meets part of the Health Informatics Core Competencies
Prerequisites: consent of the instructor

The student will learn at the conceptual and operational levels the basic mathematical principles which are needed for Computational Biomedicine and Health informatics. It will cover Calculus in one variable, elements of Linear Algebra and Probability. In addition the course will cover the application of mathematics to Computational Biomedicine and Health Informatics problems. This course will serve as a foundation for the math used in more advanced courses.

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HI 5006 Information Technology for Biomedicine (web-based instruction)

3 Semester Credits/ meets part of the Health Informatics Core Competencies Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor This course is intended to provide an overview of principles and concepts of information technology with a focus on biomedical applications. The first portion of the course will be an introduction to computing hardware and software including architecture, distributed and parallel computing, operating systems, database concepts, data communications & networking. The rest of the course will focus on applications of IT in biomedicine such as electronic health records, biomedical imaging, and bioinformatics. (formerly HI 5312)

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HI 5007 Data Structures and Algorithms in Biomedicine (web-based instruction)

3 Semester Credits/ meets part of the Health Informatics Core Competencies
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

The course is a one-semester graduate level course that examines the process of using an object oriented programming (OOP) language to building computer applications in support of health care and/or life science practice or research. Students learn modern principles of program design and implementation that enable rapid application development through reusable code modules. Students are exposed to fundamental data structures used to implement algorithms as computer programs. The course examines the structure of well-known algorithms, paying careful attention to differentiate between algorithms and programs that implement algorithms. A brief overview of the analysis of algorithms for computability is undertaken. Students develop applications of limited scope to implement algorithms in support of health care or life science processes that arise from practice and/or research. The applications will illustrate the OOP principles of encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism. Python (2.4.3) is the current course programming language. It was chosen because of its prevalence of use in the bioinformatics community and because it is open source software.

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HI 5300 Introduction to Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer and consent of instructor

This introductory graduate level course covers the discipline of informatics in health care delivery and is designed to be multi-disciplinary in nature. The course will focus on the clinical aspects of information technology and provides a broad overview to the nature of information technology, focusing on hardware, software and conceptual models of information. Students will explore different data types and data models, which are specific to their discipline and those, which can be shared across disciplines. The focus will be on comparing and contrasting the data types and data models of the different disciplines.

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HI 5301 Information Systems in the Delivery of Health Care (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/ week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will focus on the design, implementation and components of Health Care Information Systems. The course will include a history of Health Care Information Systems. This will examine the changing uses and expectations of Health Care Information Systems and the expected usage of Health Care Information Systems at each level of development. The course will explore new options in technology and design, which will allow for the clinically driven Information Systems of the future. The needs of multiple disciplines will be explored to understand how they can share and communicate patient information using Information Systems.

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HI 5302 Cognitive Science in Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course is an introduction to cognitive science--the interdisciplinary study of mind and behavior from an information processing perspective--and its application to health informatics. The course begins with a basic introduction to human cognition and information processing (both symbolic and connectionist). It then presents a broad survey of the health informatics areas to which cognitive science has been applied. These areas include health problem solving and education, decision support systems, user-centered interfaces, and the design and use of controlled medical terminologies.

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HI 5303 Decision Making in Health Care (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will survey the methods of decision-making as applied to health care situations. The course will focus on the major theories of decision-making. In addition to the theories, techniques for the application of the theories will be presented. Decision-making will be discussed in terms of data, which is necessary for informed decision-making and the types of data structures necessary. The relationship between decision-making and the development of Health Care Information Systems will be investigated. The course will investigate some of the legal and ethical aspects of decision-making, related to the decision making by health professionals and the decision making of clients.

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HI 5304 Advanced Database Concepts in Health Informatics (2 hours lectures/3 hours’ laboratory/ week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, consent of instructor.

In this course, students will use both relational and object-oriented databases to model aspects of health care delivery. Working in teams, students will analyze a practical problem related to a clinical health care situation and model the necessary information into a data model. Development of the data model will include the use of CASE tools. The data model then will be discussed with health professionals in clinical practice for relevance and accuracy. The feedback from the clinical area will be used to revise both models and to evaluate the development process.

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HI 5305 Legal Ethical Aspects of Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor.

Health Informatics involves rapidly changing technology, which impacts the way in which legal and ethical considerations are understood in our culture. This course will examine the relationships between law and ethics. Particular considerations will be given to the concepts of privacy, autonomy, responsibility and decision-making. These concepts will be discussed from both legal and ethical perspectives. The impact of current and future technology will be discussed as it relates to these concepts and the impact on Health Informatics.

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HI 5306 Health Information Systems Security (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will address security issues as they impact health information systems. Physical security of the hardware and software including redundancy, back up and restricted access will be discussed. Security and appropriateness of access will be addressed in terms of both hardware and software solutions. Data integrity, audit ability and system integrity will be considered along with the unique problems, which result from network access. Solutions to these concerns will be discussed in terms of industry standards, those, which already exist, and those, which are still evolving.

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HI 5307 Systems Analysis for Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

The purpose of this course is to assist the student in understanding the components, process and tools used in the necessary components of a health information system. The course will focus on the variety of approaches and tools available for systems analysis. Students will have experience with modeling tools and rapid prototyping tools.

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HI 5308 Introduction to Object-Oriented Systems Development in Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course enables students to develop competencies in the object-oriented approach to the design and development of computer applications in health informatics. Students will have the opportunity to apply object-oriented methods in the design, development, production and evaluation of health informatics systems applications. Students will develop object-oriented design documents and complete a course project involving development and production of a prototype computer based health informatics application.

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HI 5309 Introduction to Health Data and Electronic Health Record (web-based instruction)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will focus on Health Information and Electronic Health Records. Health Information is collected and entered by a wide variety of professionals and in some cases by the patient or client. This information is captured in a variety of formats, from pre-structured lists to narrative paragraphs. The data is used in a variety of different ways by a wide variety of users. In many cases the person who enters the data is the prime user of the data. In other cases one person enters the data, which in tern is used by others, e.g. the clinician may enter a diagnosis which is then interpreted by a coder for use in billing. Different elements of health data have different legal status. These differences are observed within a country and are more evident when comparing the legal status across countries. This course will examine how health data are collected, how they are used and the impact of electronic records on the health data. The course will review standards, and standards development, languages used, and issues related to information processing I healthcare. The course will review the impact of electronic records on health and healthcare including, legal, financial and clinical design issues

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HI 5310 Foundations of Health Information Science I (web-based instruction)

3 Semester Credits/ meets part of foundation informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course provides an overview of topics, concepts, theories and methods that form the foundations of health information sciences. It gives students the fundamental knowledge and skills to pursue further study in health informatics. Foundations I presents a general framework for health information science as the construction and use of symbolic, mathematical, and computational models for solving problems throughout the range of biomedical science, from genetics, to clinical care, to public health. It covers concepts, theories and methods that deal with how biomedical information is acquired, discovered, represented, managed, organized, communicated, retrieved, and processed. It also provides an overview of the primary research and application areas in health information science.

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HI 5311 Foundations of Health Information Science II (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of foundation informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course provides an overview of theories and methods that are broadly applicable to all health informaticians. It gives students the theoretical and methodological background needed to pursue study in health informatics. The course begins with theories of information from computational, philosophical, mathematical, logical, and biomedical perspectives.

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HI 5312 Foundations of Health Information Science III (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of foundation informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, Foundations II or consent of instructor

This course provides a broad and practical introduction to the major information processing techniques employed in all areas of health informatics: fundamentals of signals and system, frequency domain and spectral analysis, digital signal processing, pattern classification/recognition, neural networks, cluster analysis, machine learning, graphics and scientific visualization, data filtering, image processing, and linear/nonlinear modeling. The course will be useful for graduate students in health informatics who wish to obtain a broad overview of both quantitative and qualitative algorithms useful in the acquisition, management, processing, and display of health informatics and biomedical data.

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HI 5314 Technology Assessment in Healthcare (web-based instruction)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Basic statistics knowledge, HI-5315, HI-5303, HI-6311 and Consent of the instructor

This course will focus on methods and processes to evaluate positive and negative impacts of various techniques, technologies and interventions in healthcare. The focus will be standard approaches for measuring various outcomes, and development and evaluation of technology assessment models. We also focus on merging multiple measures outcomes measurement to conduct unified approach to evaluate effectiveness of planned / implemented technologies, or to compare different options. Finally, we will try to explore tool / software for the technology assessment. In this course, “Technology in Healthcare” will be used in a very broad sense, encompassing all interventions, equipment, treatment, etc., that are used in the health care field to care for consumers.

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HI 5315 Quality and Outcome Improvement in Healthcare (web-based instruction)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Basic statistics knowledge and consent of the instructor

This graduate level introductory course provides an overview to healthcare quality from the view of information science and the discipline of informatics. It takes a patient centered approach that covers the complexities of quality and the scientific basis for understanding the measurement and improvement of quality, considers the macro- and micro- levels of systems involved in quality measurement and improvement, as well as the organizational environments that are used to deliver care. It provides the learner with a framework for key theories and concepts, and models of quality improvement.

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HI 5316 Emerging Technologies for Teaching, Learning and Research (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor

Participants in this course will use emerging technologies to address challenges in teaching, learning and research. The focus is on using theory to drive the incorporation of technology for educators, informaticists and researchers. Participants will combine theories, selected technologies, appropriate pedagogy, instructional design and usability. The process will follow a model developed by the instructors to apply emerging technologies to solve problems.

HI 5321 Biomedical Signal Processing (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Background in at least one quantitative discipline (physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science) at college level.

Knowledge of at least one programming language. Scientific curiosity and imagination. Good writing skills. Interest in the crossing of boundaries between traditional scientific disciplines. This course is aimed at the applications of modern signal processing techniques in biomedicine. This course covers the basics of biomedical signals including EEG, ECG, EMG and medical imaging, and introduces various widely used signal-processing techniques. This course is for graduate students who are interested in quantitative studies of biological systems.

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HI 5323 Image Processing (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: The instructor will cater both to biological/clinical and quantitatively trained students.

A background in at least one quantitative discipline (physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science) at college level with solid background in geometry (ideally: vector calculus) is desirable. Knowledge of at least one programming language (ideally: C or C++) and UNIX, or willingness to acquire necessary skills. This course provides a broad and practical introduction to the major techniques employed in image processing and pattern recognition: dilation and erosion, segmentation and thresholding, denoising, direct space filter kernels, Fourier-based filters, matching and morphing, artificial neural networks, self-organizing maps, principal component analysis. The course will be useful for graduate students in biomedical computing who wish to learn state of the art data in mining and image vision techniques.

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HI 5324 Nanomedicine in Healthcare (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in UT-Houston, or UT-Austin or consent of the instructor

Nanomedicine is the science of the nanoscale applied to the theory and practice of medicine. This course will examine the fundamentals of nanostructured materials currently studied for medical applications. In-depth analyses of Liposomes, Dendrimers, Carbon nanotubes, Fullerenes, and Silicon nanostructures will be presented. Applications of each of these technologies in medical fields ranging from DNA chips to injected therapeutic and diagnostic agents to implanted nanodevices will be examined. Relevant characterization techniques, and Ethical, and Regulatory issues in the exciting application of Nanotechnology to Healthcare will be discussed.

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HI 5340 Introduction to Learning Environments in the Health Sciences

3-semester credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of course instructor

This course will provide an overview of learning research from the fields of cognitive science, education, psychology and neuroscience, and how this information can be applied to develop learning environments for the health sciences using current and emerging technologies. The focus of the course will be on the process of applying learning theory and pedagogy to produce targeted learning environments for populations in the health sciences, which may include health professionals, technicians/staff, the general public or patients. Following completion of the course, students will have the opportunity to obtain knowledge and resources to begin designing learning environments that are based on scientific, instructional, and technological research findings.

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HI 5341 Learning Environment Development in the Health Sciences

3 semester credits/meets part of the research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, consent of course instructor

In this course students will be responsible for choosing a health sciences content area around which to build a novel learning environment. Students will work in teams to design, develop, and create a novel learning environment, employing expertise and resources in the UTHSC-H and greater Houston community. The course grading and objectives focus on the group project, it’s design development, and the design and planning of the learning environment evaluation. Students will have the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience in creating learning environments, including the problem solving skills to be successful at this type of interdisciplinary project.

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HI 5350 Evaluation of Health Care Systems (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: personal computer, and consent of instructor

This multi-disciplinary course will focus on the process of evaluating and choosing a health information system. The course will assist the student in identifying the critical needs, which the health information system is to address. Different methods of evaluation will be presented and discussed in terms of how they would apply to health information systems. The evaluation process will begin with identifying the needs of the organization, and presenting them in an organized manner so the vendors can address the needs followed by mechanisms for evaluation.

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HI 5351 Research Design and Evaluation in Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/ weeklecture/demonstration/discussion/laboratory)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: consent of instructor

This course provides the student the opportunity to develop more advanced competencies in the design, analysis, interpretation and critical evaluation of experimental, quasi-experimental, pre-experimental and qualitative health informatics research and evaluation studies. The student will identify flaws or weaknesses in research and evaluation designs, choose which of several designs most appropriately tests a stated hypothesis or controls variables potentially jeopardizing validity, and analyze and interpret research and evaluation results. Through exposure to the basic ‘building block’ designs, students will have the opportunity to develop the competence to appropriately choose and to use the most important and frequently used design procedures for single or multifactor research or evaluation studies.

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HI 5352 Statistical Methods in Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion/laboratory)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course provides the student the opportunity to develop basic competencies in the measurement, design, analysis, interpretation and critical evaluation of health information research and evaluation studies. Students will have the opportunity to learn and apply the most important and most frequently used statistical measures and methods, as well as to critically evaluate their appropriate use in health informatics research and evaluation. Topics include the study of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, variance, hypothesis testing, correlation and both parametric and non-parametric inferential methods including t-tests, analysis of variance, chi-square tests of significance, and tests of measures of association.

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HI 5353 Health Informatics Data Analysis (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course provides the student the opportunity to know when and how to use state of the art data analysis computer software to perform each of a comprehensive set of the most important and frequently used data analysis techniques for research and evaluation in health informatics. The student will choose the most appropriate data analysis tools, to perform qualitative, descriptive, inferential, parametric, non-parametric, multifactor and multivariate techniques as well as graphical data modeling analytic techniques using the computer. Qualitative data analysis and related software will demonstrate alternate methods for data collection and reduction.

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HI 5354 Cognitive Engineering in Health Informatics I (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course focuses on cognitive engineering techniques for designing user-centered health information systems. Such systems provide appropriate functionality to the user, are easy to use and learn, reduce the chance of user error, and increase user efficiency. The course emphasizes how human cognitive abilities and limitations impose requirements on the design of effective interfaces. It covers the theory and practical application of several cognitive engineering techniques, including cognitive task analysis, verbal protocol analysis, propositional analysis, and cognitive walkthroughs

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HI 5370 Methods in Computational Biomedicine (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer and consent of instructor.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the methods and tools in computational biomedicine. The course covers the topics including basic statistics (probability, correlation and regression, statistical inference), linear algebra (vectors and matrices, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, determinants), multivariate statistics and information theory. It emphasizes the conceptual understanding and ability to apply these methods and tools to solve biomedical problems.

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HI 5380 Principles and Foundation of Public Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/ week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3-semester credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of course instructor

This course will introduce foundation knowledge of Public Health Informatics. In this course students will explore how information sciences, and computer sciences can be applied to enhance public health practice, research and education. Content will include current standards, databases, networks, information systems and technologies applied to public health. In addition, this course will cover national and regional initiative and legal aspect of public health informatics. Students will gain hands-on experience by involvement in team projects. The projects will explore a specific problem domain seeking to critically analyze and propose practical solutions.

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HI 5381 Methods in Public Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3-semester credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of course instructor

This course introduces practical methods and techniques used in Public Health Informatics (PHI). The course will focus on methods for evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of public health protection and delivery. The course modules are organized into three domain knowledge of PHI methods: 1) Legal and Policy Framework of Public Health Informatics, 2) GIS and Spatial Analysis, and 3) Evaluation and Knowledge Management of Public Health Informatics. The course is designed to familiarize students with methods for addressing the core concepts & issues confronting public health practitioners and researchers in planning, implementation and evaluation of information systems.

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HI 5382 Synthesis Project of Public Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3-semester credits/meets part of the basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of course instructor

The Public Health Informatics Synthesis Course provides an opportunity for students to practical, hands-on cumulating knowledge and experiences in Public Health Informatics. This project should reflect a substantial effort and competency of synthesis in informatics developed through the course training that address core competencies of public health informatics system by working through the problem of students’ choice. The selected problem should be discussed and approved by a faculty mentor. This should be tied to research/practice of your interest that includes one or more didactic modules covered in the prior courses. The synthesis project should be based upon the combined efforts of (online) library database search, fieldwork, and mentored research approved by mentor(s). Expectations of the class should include the presentation of the conclusions from the project in a written manner for academic dissemination as a conference abstract, poster.

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HI 6000 Practicum in Health Informatics (Variable hours/week)

1-10 Semester Credits
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

During the practicum, each student will select an area of interest in which to apply the knowledge and skill gained during the didactic courses. Students will become active participants in the work of developing informatics-based applications. Each student will develop a specific set of goals to be accomplished. The student’s advising committee and practicum supervisor must accept these goals. These goals will reflect the student’s area of interest and the needs of the precepting organization. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis and is repeated for a maximum of 6 semester credit hours to meet degree requirements.

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HI 6001 Special Topics: Health Informatics (Variable hours/week)

1-10 Semester Credits
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

This course provides a timely way to examine cutting edge topics of interest to students and faculty. The varying content may include topics such as: technical writing in health informatics comparing knowledge use across disciplines, computational knowledge methods in health informatics. May be repeated as topics vary.

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HI 6002 Directed Study: Health Informatics (Variable hours/week)

1-10 Semester Credits
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

This course provides a mechanism for students to explore issues of personal interest in the field of Health Informatics. The varying content may include topics such as: display of large scale nursing data, mapping issues for dentistry, linking public health knowledge to clinical medicine. This course may be graded on a letter grade or pass/fail basis. May be repeated as topics vary.

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HI 6300 Advanced Health Information Systems (2 hours lecture /3 hours laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will examine advanced concepts in health informatics systems, including mechanisms for linking current information systems with legacy systems; network based information systems, community health information systems (CHINs) and communication among disparate information systems. Topics will include identifiers; electronic data interchange systems and new models of information systems. Emphasis will be given to issues of how computational knowledge techniques affect the kind and type of knowledge displayed. Automation of knowledge reorganization as it is transferred among disciplines and settings will be discussed.

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HI 6301 Health Data Display (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will examine the evaluation and design of information displays for healthcare. The course will focus on three areas: (1) theories and methodologies for the evaluation of information displays, (2) techniques and tools for generating effective information displays through visualization, and (3) how the formats of information displays affect decision making in healthcare.

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HI 6302 Knowledge Modeling and Engineering in Health Informatics I (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion/laboratory)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course first covers in depth the methods and techniques for knowledge modeling and engineering in healthcare. This includes an introduction on how to conduct a task analysis, and how to collect and analyze domain knowledge gathered from reference sources or expert behavior. The course will cover how these methods and techniques are used to construct health informatics systems that are more robust, more helpful, and easier to use than systems engineered without these techniques. Also covered are various techniques for evaluating the accuracy and effectiveness of the constructed systems from experimental data. The students also have an opportunity to engineer knowledge models using connectionist representations. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on how knowledge engineering is used to design decision support tools, tutoring systems, and educational improvements for health informatics. In the second part of the course, students are given a knowledge engineering task in a healthcare area for which they must develop a knowledge model and then construct and evaluate a knowledge-based system.

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HI 6303 Introduction to Telehealth (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, consent of instructor

The course will provide an overview of telehealth in the context of the general health care system. It will survey the application of telehealth in various medical specialties and different settings, e.g., rural, military/aerospace and corrections. The course will identify key issues in implementing and operating a telehealth program including technology, economics, legal/ethical, training, protocol development, and evaluation.

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HI 6304 Consultation in Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

Health Informatics requires that practitioner’s work closely with others in developing health informatics based interventions. The interventions can include determining the nature and type of system that needs to be developed, an understanding of what is involved in the delivery of care and understanding the social and political aspects of change within an organization. This course will describe the nature of the consultation role; explore the options and strategies available to consultant that can make the consultant role more efficient.

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HI 6305 Social Dynamics and Health Information (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

The implementation of information systems will not only greatly enhance the quality of healthcare but also radically change the nature of healthcare. This course will look at healthcare as a distributed system composed of groups of people interacting with each other and with information technology. Two major areas will be covered in the course. The first area is computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), which is defined as computer-assisted coordinated activity such as reasoning, problem solving, decision-making, routine tasks, and communication carried out by a group of collaborating individuals who interact with complex information technology. Most health information systems (such as EMR) are large groupwares that support large numbers of synchronous and asynchronous users with diverse background in the executions of many different types of tasks. The second area is the social impact of information technology. This area will focus on the impact of Internet on healthcare, such as the functions and impacts of virtual communities, online health groups, and tele-healthcare through the web.

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HI 6306 Information and Knowledge Representation in Health Informatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: HI 5310 Foundations of Health Information Sciences I

Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor The purpose of this course is to examine the role of information representation, controlled vocabularies and knowledge engineering constructs such as ontologies in conceptualization, design and implementation of modern health information systems. The course will introduce approaches for representing information and knowledge in a distributed network of health information systems. Moving beyond a general understanding of taxonomies, students will gain an understanding of the conceptual foundations of ontologies including the limitations of the modern systems. Knowledge modeling and engineering principals will be introduced through lectures, hands on practice and the class project. This will include the design, construction and use of ontologies in health care applications. Through hands on experience, students will gain insight into the strengths and limitations of the existing resources, approaches and systems as well as point to directions where future work needs to be done. HI

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6307 Cognitive Engineering in Health Informatics II (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

In this course, students identify a real-world medical or health-related task or problem that might be improved through the use of cognitive engineering techniques. Once identified, students will have the opportunity to apply the techniques and then use the results to outline appropriate ways to improve behavior on the task or to rectify the problem. The course is designed to permit an in-depth study of cognitive engineering techniques through their application to real-world health informatics problems. from federal agencies, volunteer organizations, consumer services and direct consumer-to-consumer communications. The availability of information with varying degrees of quality is changing the way consumers think about their own health as well as changing the relationship between consumers and providers. Students will explore the impact of this technology, consider the directions which the current technology might head and explore the potentials of future technology on the delivery of healthcare. This is a research course and students will be expected to complete a research project that contributes to our understanding of consumer health informatics.

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HI 6309 Healthcare Interface Design (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course covers topics of user interface design for health information systems, medical devices, consumer health web sites, and other healthcare related systems. Students will have the opportunity to learn the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction and human factors and learn how to apply them to real world problems through class projects. The focus is on learning why user friendly interfaces can greatly improve work productivity and enhance the quality of healthcare without radically changing the underlying technology.

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HI 6310 Knowledge Modeling II (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

In this course, students identify a medical or health-related task that might be improved through the use of a decision-support system, intelligent tutoring system, or educational intervention. Once identified, students conduct a task analysis and design an appropriate knowledge engineering project plan to develop and implement a knowledge-based system for this task. They then have the opportunity to evaluate the resulting system and outline appropriate ways to improve human performance on the task through the use of the system.

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HI 6311 Advanced Decision Analysis I (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will focus on decisions made with high degrees of uncertainty. The focus will be on modeling the decisions and the types of uncertainty which are present in the decision making process. The focus will be on developing ways to reduce the amount and types of uncertainty while still maintaining the key elements of the decision making process. In addition, the course will focus on ways to automate the decision making process in terms of the way in which data, information and knowledge is aggregated, the modeling of the decision data against existing standards or protocols and presenting alternative display approaches to the understanding of the data, information and knowledge employed in the decision making process.

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HI 6312 Project Management in Healthcare (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer and consent of instructor.

This is an introduction to Project management that is structured for students who have begun to run their own projects. This is project based to develop managers for large healthcare projects. These projects can include a system implementation, evaluation of an existing system, or other large project.

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HI 6313 Scientific Writing in Healthcare (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of basic informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course provides the advanced skills necessary to write a full range of scientific manuscripts in health informatics. It begins with the philosophy of science, types of scientific research, and types of scientific manuscripts (including review, applied, and research articles). The course then examines each component of a scientific manuscript in detail, including the title, abstract, introduction, literature review, method, discussion, conclusion, and appendices. The course covers the purpose of each of these components, discusses properties that distinguish good components from bad, and presents techniques for producing high quality scientific writing. Students will apply these techniques by examining selected published papers, producing their own scientific writing, and critiquing the writing of others in the class. Students are expected to enter the class with a draft scientific paper that they have written and a high degree of general writing skill.

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HI 6321 Applied Computational Biomedicine (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, consent of instructor, and admission to the doctoral program

Application of computational theories, algorithms and methods to issues and problems of the student’s choice under the guidance of the faculty. This course focuses on the solution of biomedical problems using computational approaches and methods. Students will select appropriate methodology to solve their assigned problem(s), apply them and if applicable compare results between different methods. Evaluation of success will include determining applicability to similar classes of problems and how to address the solution in a practical setting.

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HI 6322 Advanced Topics in Computational Biomedicine (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer and consent of instructor.

In this course selected topics in computational biomedicine, based on students’ interests, will be studied in depth. The focus will be on how different computational approaches can be applied to study any single biomedical problem. Among the topics covered will include machine learning, pattern learning, data mining and computational modeling, in biomedicine and bioinformatics.

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HI 6323 Datamining in Bioinformatics (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/ discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the advanced informatics component Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer and consent of instructor. Recent advances in genomic technologies, especially the microarray/gene chips technology enable biologists to generate large amount of complex data. To explore the meaning of the data, one needs sophisticated data mining algorithms and tools. This course is intended to explore different problems and methods in bioinformatics with focus on the computational and data mining methods for complex data such as microarray data. A set of basic computational methods and models for analyzing genomic and structural biological data from high throughput technologies will be introduced. Students will be required to complete mini projects on some of the methods.

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HI 6324 Computational Cognitive Neuroscience (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/ demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the advanced informatics component Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer and consent of instructor. This course introduces the ideas and methods used in simulating cognitive and perceptual processes using computational models based on the neural networks of the brain. In other words, this course teaches cognitive neuroscience (understanding how the brain gives rise to thought) using computer models as a tool. These models provide a computational bridge between behavioral and biological levels of analysis. A range of cognitive phenomena, including perception, attention, memory, priming, language, and higher-level cognition (“executive” control, planning, etc) will be examined. Students are required to develop a non-trivial computational model of a cognitive process they select.

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HI 6325 Reasoning and Decision Making in Medicine (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of the advanced informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer

Cognitive Science in Health Informatics or consent of instructor. This course teaches students advanced theories and methods in human reasoning and decision making. The course emphasizes important empirical and theoretical findings about human reasoning and decision-making in the broad area of biomedicine, with an attempt to reach a comprehensive understanding on why people reason and decide the way they do. Important issues including normative models VS descriptive models, rationality, heuristics and bias, will be discussed.

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HI 6351 Triangulation Methods in Health Informatics Research (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets part of research informatics component
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

This course will combine quantitative and qualitative methods into an integrated research approach. Much of the innovative research in Health Informatics requires that students be involved in the design and measurement of studies where reliable and valid measures do not exist for all concepts and constructs. Both methodological approaches can be combined to give insights that would not be possible from either method alone. The course will explore the methodological assumptions, the applications and the software, which can support triangulation methods.

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HI 7000 Advanced Preceptorship (Variable hours /week)

1-9 Semester Credits Required for doctoral students
Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program

The student will use this course to develop a pilot study to design the instrument that will be used in the data collection for the dissertation. The student must complete 9 semester credit hours with the supervision of the mentor or primary advisor. The study with the data will be used to prepare the advance to candidacy proposal.

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HI 7050 Research in Health Informatics (Variable hours/week)

1-21 Semester Credits Required for doctoral students
Prerequisites: Advanced to candidacy exam successfully completed.

The doctoral candidate must complete 21 hours of research in health informatics. The mentor or primary advisor will supervise the advancement of the candidate’s progress.

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HI 7100 Career Development in Health Informatics (1-hour lecture/discussion)

Post Doctoral Students will explore various mechanisms and processes that will enhance their development to become a faculty member at an institution of higher education. The topics will include but not limited to: salary negotiation, start up package negotiation, grant preparation, promotion and tenure expectations, and publication expectations. This course is required for the Post Doctoral Certificate program.

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HI 7150 Research Seminar (1 hour lecture/demonstration/discussion)

Required for doctoral program. May be repeated for 3 hours to meet the degree requirement.

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HI 7200 Supervised Research (2 hour discussion)

Post Doctoral Fellows will work with their mentor to learn the process of managing and conducting a research project. This may include project management skills, proposal writing, and specific professional or scientific skills needed for a particular research project. This course is required for the Post Doctoral Certificate program. This course may be repeated each semester that the Post Doc is in the certificate program.

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HI 7301 Grant Writing (2 hours lecture/3 hours’ laboratory/week lecture/demonstration/discussion)

3 Semester Credits/meets required course for the doctoral degree.
Prerequisites: Access to the Internet, personal computer, and consent of instructor

Students will develop skills in the planning and execution of grant development. The focus will be on NIH and NSF grants forms, but students will also be exposed to grant applications from private organizations. The focus of the course will be to develop a draft, which can be used for the funding of dissertation work, or to develop a grant, which would allow them to continue their dissertation work in a post-dissertation award. Students will learn how to write the narrative, project time lines, include appropriate evaluation and draft budgets.

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HI 9999 Dissertation in Health Informatics (Variable hours)

Required for the doctoral program. May be repeated for 9 hours to meet the degree requirement.

 

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